University of Kent

University of Kent

Testimonial from the University of Kent ESHCon recently helped the University of Kent implement their Environmental Management System. They kindly provided the following testimonial, after successful certification to ISO 14001.   “The University of Kent is the size of a small town in terms of its geographical size, population and operations, and contains a good deal more in the way of environmental features and risks.  Building an EMS was a daunting task – especially as the elaborate system which appeared necessary would have been unwieldy and doomed to failure.  Anya provided the perfect means to help us draw the many strands together into a really lean and manageable system which nevertheless covers all our requirements and really delivers.  Her vision of how this would take shape overall, her wide and detailed subject knowledge, and her highly personable manner were vital to driving the project forward, and getting numerous key players enthused.  We achieved accredited certification to ISO 14001 in just 14 months, which...
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Adding weight

Adding weight

Adding weight: rating significance This article was published in IEMA's The Environmentalist magazine (Nov 12 issue) - click here   Anya Ledwith on the best ways to rate the significance of environmental aspects within an environment management system The foundation of a good quality environment management system (EMS) is an understanding of the organisation’s aspects and impacts. This information should be used to recognise the need for, and determine the type of, operational controls required. Developing a process to rank these aspects for significance ensures that the EMS is not overwhelmed from the start.   Avoiding confusion There is sometimes confusion in differentiating between environmental aspects and impacts. ISO 14001 defines aspects as activities, products or services that can interact with the environment, while impacts are any change to the environment (adverse or beneficial) resulting from an aspect. So, for example, consider business journeys by car: activity – driving a car aspect – use of diesel as fuel impact – resulting air pollution In its initial environmental review, the...
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Training for Continuous Improvement

Training for Continuous Improvement Embedding environmental management into your business will deliver true commercial benefits. Training staff on their roles & responsibilities is critical in finding improvements and cost savings.   There has been a 38% rise in people qualifying in environmental-related subjects over the past nine years, according to a study by the Higher Education Statistics Agency, with significant increases in the last two years.   If you are new to environmental management, training will get you started. If your company already has an Environmental Management System in place, then training will help you with the much needed ‘continual improvement’.   A leading certification body recently reviewed all of its clients’ management systems and the types of non-conformances raised against the various standards (environmental, H&S or quality). Consistently they found that, regardless of the standard, more non-conformances related to training and communication than any other.   Make sure that your staff are engaged and properly trained to avoid these problems. ESHCon offers training courses for people in businesses...
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When H&S Becomes SHE

When H&S Becomes SHE

When H&S Becomes SHE When companies decide to address environmental matters, they may appoint a new dedicated member of staff. Or it may fall to the H&S Officer, or someone in facilities or HR, to take on the role. These staff may feel overwhelmed, lacking the knowledge or skills to adapt from H&S to ‘SHE’.   Before you start, understand your company’s objectives. Is it to save money, comply with current or future legislation, improve reputation or implement ISO 14001 for tender applications? This will guide your approach.   Review your organisation to identify its main environmental aspects & impacts. These could involve energy, waste, carbon emissions, travel, materials use, biodiversity, discharges or procurement.   From these, identify your action plan – set tasks, responsibilities and timescales. Don’t try to do everything at once. Start with the most significant and manageable activities.   Make sure you’re legally compliant. Like H&S, there is a host of environmental legislation.   Set targets for improvement and report on your progress, communicating regularly with your...
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